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Archive for the ‘intel’ Category

More info on the NIE

Days after the initial release of the National Intelligence Estimate, there are yet more questions and articles. As I am not an ‘expert’ in this field, I would like to take this time to provide yet more ‘expert’ input.

A gentleman has left me a comment querying into the veracity of my last post. He was rather kind, while he may disagree with me, so I am going to attempt to try to satisfy his search for answers to back up my assertions. Here is his comment:

Try as I might, I couldn’t find a fact to back up your assertion that the intelligence community is anti-Bush. And even if these 16 separate intelligence agencies are anti-Bush, maybe it is because they are anti-bulls#*t and pro-American.

I have decided not to post his name, because I do not wish to be unfair to him. I only wish to clear up matters.

First I have Decoding the U.S. National Intelligence Estimate on Iran’s Nuclear Weapons Program, written by Prof. Gerald M. Steinberg.

While the NIE states that the U.S. intelligence community has “high confidence” that the Iranians halted their nuclear weapons program in 2003, it also states that it has only “moderate confidence” that Tehran has not restarted the program.1 In contrast, Israeli Defense Minister Ehud Barak has said that while it is “apparently true that in 2003, Iran stopped pursuing its military nuclear program for a certain period of time,” nonetheless, he adds that “in our estimation, since then it is apparently continuing with its program to produce a nuclear weapon.”2 [Continue reading.]

Since this is a Jewish intelligence source, I shall also introduce another. This person everyone is well familiar with, because you either like him or him. No matter. He used to work at the State Department, and he also worked at the UN.

This is what Ambassador John Bolton has to say about the NIE:

The Flaws In the Iran Report

The real differences between the NIEs are not in the hard data but in the psychological assessment of the mullahs’ motives and objectives. The current NIE freely admits to having only moderate confidence that the suspension continues and says that there are significant gaps in our intelligence and that our analysts dissent from their initial judgment on suspension. This alone should give us considerable pause. [Continue reading.]

John R. Bolton, a former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, is the author of “Surrender Is Not an Option: Defending America at the United Nations and Abroad.” He is a senior fellow at the American Enterprise Institute.

There are five very important points that he makes in this Washington Post editorial. He knows intelligence. He is an expert. I suggest you read this short article.

Maybe you would like to hear from a trusted Democrat, Sen. Lieberman?

CNBC “Kudlow & Company” Interview with Senator Joe Lieberman (ID-CT)
Interviewer: Larry Kudlow
Subject: Iran’s Nuclear Program and the National Intelligence Estimate
.

MR. KUDLOW: Today’s blockbuster headline from the New Intelligence Estimate says Iran stopped making nukes in 2003. But Senator Joe Lieberman, independent Democrat from Connecticut, told me that Iran is still a very dangerous place. Take a look.

(Begin videotaped interview.)

SEN. LIEBERMAN: Well, what I make of it is that there’s some encouraging news in this National Intelligence Estimate, which is that the Iranians apparently have stopped one part of their nuclear weapons program. But the headline you just read shows the danger here, which is that people will reach a conclusion that all of our concern about Iran building nuclear weapons was misplaced, it’s over, there’s no problem. If you read this report, this intelligence report, you see that that’s not true. It says very clearly Iran has both the capacity and intention to build a nuclear weapon. And in fact, they are focused now on the first, most important thing that they need to do, which is to enrich uranium. So this is not cause for complacency. There’s still a lot about what Iran is doing that should concern us and encourage us to keep the economic and diplomatic pressure on them. [You must be registered to read the rest. I am not.]

Please read them all. I could not even start to summarize all the data forth coming. This is a a link to keep on eye on the ME from Irsael Intelligence, and this is a great link to gather information on Iran. After you have read the links I have provided, I rest my case. I hope this satisfatory. I do not wish to mislead anyone who may read my posts. Thank you, and have a great day.

This is my Open Trackback Alliance and Linkfest post. I hope I can finally write about something other than this NIE. Really. There is too much happening in this world to be dragged into a non-debate over beaurocratic bs. I hope everyone is having a very nice day.

Posts I’ve trackbacked to at Linkfest: Outside the Beltway, The Random Yak, Adam’s Blog, Right Truth, The World According to Carl, Pirate’s Cove, The Pink Flamingo, Leaning Straight Up, The Amboy Times, Chuck Adkins, CommonSenseAmerica, and The Yankee Sailor, thanks to Linkfest Haven Deluxe.

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    Source: US Central Command.

    07 November 2007
    By Cpl. Billy Hall
    2nd Marine Division
    .

    AL QA’IM, Iraq — Henry David Thoreau once wrote, “There are a thousand hacking at the branches of evil to one who is striking at the root.”

    Prepared to unearth any remnants of those who intend to plant fear and insecurity in western Iraq, the Betio Bastards stand ready. With the final elements of the battalion arriving to their area of operation, the Marines and sailors of Task Force 3rd Battalion, 2nd Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 2, are primed and in place to maintain stability and bring prosperity to the region.

    The infantry companies are set in motion and have started providing security and orienting themselves with the local populace. The numerous support elements of Headquarters and Support Company have also hit the ground running, providing intelligence, logistical support, communications and transportation, to name a few of their many missions.

    Months of intense training have paid off in dividends, allowing the battalion to kick off their deployment without missing a beat. Lt. Col. Peter B. Baumgarten, the battalion commander, met with the mayor, leaders of the Iraqi Police and Army, and numerous sheiks, to publicly assume command of the area of operation from Lt. Col. Jason Q. Bohm, the battalion commander of Task Force 1st Bn., 4th Marines.

    “I, like Colonel Bohm, look to fill the shoes of my predecessors in a way that will be very positive to the people of Al Qa’im,” Baumgarten said. “I look forward to meeting each one of you and working together in the future months to be successful.” The atmosphere was optimistic and productive as key leaders discussed several pressing issues and plans for the future, such as reopening the point of entry at the Syrian border in the town of Husaybah.

    The sheiks spoke of unity amongst the many tribes within the region and setting a path of success for the rest of Iraq to follow. At the conclusion of the meeting, the local leaders and sheiks treated the Marines to a traditional Iraqi meal. In customary fashion, there were no utensils; everyone ate with their hands from large platters of rice, vegetables and goat. The meeting and luncheon helped to lay the groundwork for the battalion’s transition into their third deployment to Iraq in three years.

    During the initial days of operation, the battalion’s progress has been substantial. Cooperation and coordination with the local leaders and forces are proving to be the crucial elements contributing to maintaining the security and bringing prosperity to Iraq. The Betio Bastards will continue working steadily to uproot any instability that remains.

    Photo – Lt. Col. Jason Q. Bohm (right), battalion commander of Task Force 1st Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 2, and Lt. Col. Peter B. Baumgarten (center), battalion commander of Task Force 3rd Bn., 2nd Marines, speak with a sheik after the meeting where Bohm publicly relinquished command of his area of operations to Baumgarten. The mayor, leaders of the Iraqi police and army, and numerous sheiks attended the meeting to discuss several pressing issues and plans for the future.

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    27 Aug 07
    By Staff Sgt. Cassandra Locke
    380th Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs
    .

    SOUTHWEST ASIA – SOUTHWEST ASIA — Global Hawk and U-2 aircraft provide critical intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, and in order to be efficient and effective the technological sensors on these aircraft cannot be subjected to heat for extended periods of time.

    Due to the compact size of the Global Hawk and the freezing temperatures at its normal operating altitudes, the aircraft does not have a robust environmental control unit to keep the numerous electronic systems cool in very warm temperatures. “That is why the hangar the aircraft are kept in has air conditioning and we perform almost all of our launches and recoveries at night when it is ‘slightly’ cooler,” said 2nd Lt. David Bates, 380th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, referring to the Global Hawk.

    The tolerance for hot temperatures for the main operating computer on the Global Hawk is 105 degrees Fahrenheit. This was a major factor recently when one of the aircraft was returning to base with an in-flight discrepancy, according to Bates. “We were unable to launch the spare aircraft due to difficulties with the communications hub on the aircraft and subsequent faults,” said the lieutenant.

    After the first shutdown on the Global Hawk, the team was in the process of devising a system that would allow them to be able to launch the aircraft in mid-day heat. Then an opportunity presented itself. After troubleshooting the aircraft for hours in the midday heat, 380th airmen were concerned about the aircraft compartment temperatures. The call was made to press with the launch and the aircraft was able to taxi onto the runway and begin to take off. “Only seconds later the aircraft autonomously stopped the takeoff roll due to an over temperature indication,” Bates said. He said that if the aircraft’s onboard fuel, used to cool the sensor systems, got too hot during operation, the system was designed to halt operations in an effort to save its expensive components. “It was just very unfortunate timing that it stopped right after it started to take off because as soon as it gained some altitude it would have cooled quickly,” he said.

    Shortly after the event, the team members found themselves in a “nightmarish” repeat of what happened days earlier. Another one of their aircraft was returning to the base and they had to turn another aircraft to get the mission complete in the middle of the day. “This time we were already working on the aircraft to troubleshoot some issues; we only have three jets and were flying every day, so maintenance had to use whatever time they could and so it had been already outside for some time,” said Bates. Due to the winds that day, they also had to tow the aircraft to the opposite end of the runway, about a 45-minute and two-mile tow on the ramp that, at the time, was about 145 degrees Fahrenheit. “The time required to tow plus the time it would take to prepare and launch the jet would almost certainly send the temperatures of our compartments through the roof,” Bates said.

    Senior Master Sgt. Kevin Brogan, 380th Expeditionary Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, suggested getting a water truck from the fire department and hosing down the aircraft wings where the fuel that cools the components is stored. “The fire department’s responsiveness was impressive and they were quite eager to assist,” said Bates. Capt. Fernando Colon, 380th EAMXS, took another initiative and got a pressure washer so they could cool the aircraft wings while towing. Once on the spot, they were quick to pre-flight and get the aircraft in the air; from engine start to takeoff was about 18 minutes. “Operators indicated that the internal component temperatures were cooler than some of the launches we do at night. The aircraft launched and completed a successful mission,” Bates said.

    For the U-2 aircraft, the purpose is to develop the most efficient aircraft and sensor cooling process possible and minimize the amount of time aircraft and sensors are exposed to heat as well. The maintainers’ greatest challenge is keeping the aircraft and sensors cool until the aircraft gets airborne. “In order to do this, we have orchestrated a “NASCAR” pit crew style launch,” said Capt. Randal Hoewt, 380th EAMXS. The team has 10 people involved with the launch process; each person has a choreographed job that must be done in conjunction with the other members to ensure the launch goes smoothly.

    “Another challenge we face is keeping the aerospace ground equipment from overheating,” said the captain. “After experimenting with different configurations of equipment we found the optimal set-up that ensures max cooling air and prevents the equipment from overheating.” One solution to this problem that squadron airmen suggested was to include work with the AGE flight maintainers to inspect the AGE equipment and replace all worn hoses, gaskets and seals. According to Hoewt, they also determined optimum AGE positioning for aircraft launch by marking all positions, creating an AGE template around the aircraft so there would be the same set-up for every launch.

    They eliminated the cooling cart, power cart and air cart repositioning by developing an AGE driver drop box. They eliminated unnecessary cooling hoses by positioning the equipment safely as close to aircraft as possible, resulting in maximum airflow volume with minimal cold air dissipation. While the maintainers are minimizing the amount of time the aircraft and sensors are exposed to the heat, they ensure sensor nose covers are installed at all times and cooling air is applied a minimum of three hours prior to flight and left on aircraft until the last possible second. “We minimize the time the aircraft and sensors are exposed to the heat on recovery as well,” said Hoewt. “We will tow the aircraft back into the hangar as soon as we can.”

    Squadron maintainers also have created a seven-minute launch sequence mentality across maintenance and operations, according to the captain. By working with the operators, they were able to reduce the pre-launch time from approximately 25 minutes down to seven. This has paid huge dividends in sensor reliability and also reduced aircrew discomfort. Cruising at extremely high altitudes, Global Hawks and U-2s survey large geographic areas with pinpoint accuracy to give military decision-makers the most current information about enemy location, resources and personnel.

    Photo – Master Sgt. Kevin Wirth hoses down the wing of a Global Hawk in an effort to cool it off. The Global Hawk and U-2 aircraft at this deployed location in Southwest Asia provide critical intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance and in order to be efficient and effective, the technological sensors on these aircraft cannot be subjected to heat for extended periods of time. Wirth is with the 380th Expeditionary Civil Engineer Squadron. U.S. Air Force photo.

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    26 Aug 07
    by Multi-National Division-North
    Public Affairs Office
    .

    BAGHDAD – Operation Lightning Hammer concluded Wednesday after a 12-day, large-scale operation to disrupt al-Qaeda and other terrorist elements in the Diyala River Valley, a complex area of villages and palm groves in Iraq’s Diyala province.

    The operation, which involved approximately 16,000 Iraqi and Coalition forces clearing approximately 50 villages, was a key element in Multi-National Corps-Iraq’s overall operation, Phantom Strike; and resulted in 26 al-Qaeda members killed, 37 suspected terrorists detained and the discovery of 10 weapons caches. “The strength and determination of the fighting men and women from the Iraqi and Coalition forces showed great results during Lightning Hammer,” said U.S. Army Col. David W. Sutherland, commander of Coalition forces in Diyala province. “We have continued to diminish their supplies and disable al-Qaeda’s abilities to disrupt the population.”

    Soldiers from the 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, partnered with members of the 5th Iraqi Army Division, initiated the operation with a late-night air assault into targeted locations on Aug. 13, and conducted an additional three air-assaults during the course of the operation. Residents of most villages welcomed the security forces, providing tips and intelligence about recent activities in their towns, and were interested in joining the Iraqi Security Forces. Following clearing operations, the Iraqi Army provided medical assistance and humanitarian aid to the local citizens, many of whom said their villages were recently influenced by al-Qaeda.

    More importantly, more than 80 tribal leaders and representatives, some of whom had not spoken in over a year, met Aug. 19 to discuss their grievances and swore on the Quran to unite in their fight against terrorists and become one tribe of Diyala. “As I conducted my battlefield circulation and talked with many of the citizens, they repeatedly thanked our Soldiers, but more importantly, their security forces, for liberating their towns from the terrorists – specifically al-Qaeda,” Sutherland said. “Because their villages have been cleared, the local and central governments will now be able to provide those essential services al-Qaeda destroyed, and the people feel a sense of security they have not known for some time.”

    Throughout the operation, the Task Force Lightning Soldiers also discovered 22 improvised explosive devices, 11 of which were discovered based on tips from a police chief in the river valley, and reduced three house-borne IEDs and six vehicle-borne IEDs, all of which could have been used to harm a large portion of the population or security forces. Additionally, an al-Qaeda command post was discovered in the village of Shadia, and an al-Qaeda medical clinic was located in Qaryat Sunayjiyah.

    The command post, which was surrounded by fighting positions, contained bed space for 20 individuals, supply requests, records of munitions, a list of families supporting the element, a list of al-Qaeda members detained by Coalition forces and other terrorist propaganda. “Although we didn’t find many of the terrorists, the operation proved to be a great success because we disrupted al-Qaeda, causing them to run,” Sutherland continued. “Their fear of facing our forces proves that the terrorists know there is no safe haven for them in Diyala.

    “And though this specific operation is over, our fight is not over,” he continued. “We will continue to aggressively target al-Qaeda, and ultimately, they will be brought to justice.” The results of Lightning Hammer cleared the Diyala River Valley of al-Qaeda and allowed Iraqi and Coalition forces to maintain a permanent presence in Mukeisha, a village in the heart of the river valley area.

    Photo – Spc. Samuel Melendez, Bravo Trop, 5th Battalion, 73rd Cavalry Regiment, patrols a mrash outside of Qubah, a small village in the Diyala province. The patrol was part of Operation Lightning Hammer, a maneuver to flush insurgents from the area. Photo by Sgt. Patrick Lair, 115th MPAD.

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    9 Aug 07
    by Master Sgt. Steve Horton
    332nd Air Expeditionary Wing Public Affairs
    .

    BALAD AIR BASE, Iraq (AFPN) – When terrorists tried shooting mortar rounds at Balad Air Base in July, they didn’t count on the tireless, unblinking eye of an MQ-1 Predator unmanned aerial vehicle overhead, transmitting their every move to Airmen on the ground here.

    Airmen assigned to the 46th Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron here kept the Predator overhead July 24 watching the men while they confirmed what they were seeing with a joint terminal attack controller on the ground. After confirmation, the order was given for the Predator to launch an air strike and moments later a Hellfire air-to-ground missile struck the terrorists’ car when they fled, killing the three terrorists.

    “The Predator crews go through the same targeting and approval processes as a pilot flying another strike aircraft before shooting a weapon,” said Col. Marilyn Kott, the 332nd Expeditionary Operations Group deputy commander. “They coordinate with ground forces to confirm targets and coordinate on the best course of action for the situation.

    Sometimes the best course of action is launching an air strike, other times it can mean remaining overhead to observe or follow possible insurgents as they move around the countryside. “The crews flying the Predator report possible enemy activity and give the joint terminal attack controller and the ground and air commanders the opportunity to decide what they want to do with that information,” Colonel Kott said. “They can agree that the activity needs to be stopped right away and can target the perpetrators.” Because the Predator has a long loiter time, it is an ideal platform for intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance, so the 46th ERS mission load has increased.

    June, a busy month for most U.S. and coalition forces conducting and supporting combat operations throughout Iraq, was a record setting month for the 46th ERS. They recorded a record number of combat sorties and flying hours for the Predator during the month. More than 175 combat sorties were generated, producing 3,279 flying hours.

    July was just as busy for Predator operations. The 46th ERS flew the same number of combat sorties as in June, but increased flying hours to more than 3,300.

    “It says a lot about how much the Predator is employed and how busy the 332nd Air Expeditionary Wing is now as opposed to some previous periods of Operation Iraqi Freedom,” Colonel Kott said. “That’s partially because the wing and the (continental United States) Predator units have increased OIF Predator capability, developing logistics and technologies to make the system more successful in a deployed environment.” And with success comes more requests for the Predator’s service.

    “The air battle staff asks for the Predator constantly because it provides such a fine (intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance) platform, and it’s always airborne,” the colonel said. “The objective here is to find and follow activity that might be aiding the insurgents.”

    “The sorties and hours are increasing as a result of increased demand,” said Maj. Jon Dagley, the 46th ERS commander. “Currently, the Predator is the most requested asset in theater. As warriors continue to recognize how the Predator works, what it brings to the fight, and what it can do for them, its demand will only continue to skyrocket.”

    Even with the number of sorties and flying hours increasing, the colonel is quick to point out the rigorous thought process that goes into the decision to launch an air strike or not. “The (improvised explosive devices) terrorists are planting, for example, don’t just affect our convoys, they pose a danger to civilians living here too,” Colonel Kott said. “The more surgical we can be at stopping insurgent behavior, the better (it will be) for the civilians trying to get on with their lives.”

    The 46th ERS, consisting of less than a dozen Airmen, is responsible for the takeoff and landing of Balad AB’s fleet of Predators as well as flying operations within a 25-mile radius of the base. Every sortie is manned on the ground by a pilot, who flies the aircraft and controls the weapons system by remote control, and a sensor operator, who controls the camera view and laser targeting system on the aircraft.

    Once the Predator is in the air, the pilot and sensor operator will locate a target point used to zero in the weapons system. The sensor operator works with ground members to ensure the laser, which guides the Predator’s weapons system, is on target. When the weapons system has been zeroed in, the pilot prepares to hand control of the Predator to Airmen stationed halfway around the world at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., or at March Air Reserve Base, Calif.

    “The Predator is coming into its own as a no-kidding weapon versus a reconnaissance-only platform,” Major Dagley said. “The work it is doing with its precision-strike capability on top of top-notch ISR, is forcing many people to stand up and take notice. It is forging new ground almost daily. It is paving the way for future technologies and applications, and, as a result, tactics.”

    By coming into its own as a weapon, to compliment its ISR capability, the number of Predator sorties and flying hours will continue to increase. That’s good news to U.S. and coalition forces, and bad news to the terrorists who think they can continue to threaten the security of Iraq.

    Photo – Capt. Richard Koll, left, and Airman 1st Class Mike Eulo perform function checks after launching an MQ-1 Predator unmanned aerial vehicle Aug. 7 at Balad Air Base, Iraq. Captain Koll, the pilot, and Airman Eulo, the sensor operator, will handle the Predator in a radius of approximately 25 miles around the base before handing it off to personnel stationed in the United States to continue its mission. Both are assigned to the 46th Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron. Photo by Master Sgt. Steve Horton.

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    8 Aug 07
    By Cpl. Eric C. Schwartz
    2nd Marine Division
    .

    HUSAYBAH, Iraq – It was a quiet morning patrol; a standard Alpha Company mission. Donkeys, attached to carts, were unmanned while their owners were just waking up to the sound of roosters making their morning calls. The Marines were heading directly to solve a mystery. Who shot up a citizen’s house and why?

    “We had an intelligence-driven patrol where a house was shot up a week ago,” said Cpl. Travis Banks, a team leader with 1st Platoon, Alpha Company, Task Force 1st Battalion, 4th Marines attached to Regimental Combat Team 2.

    Marines are trained in various ways to combat terrorism, whether it is a full-scale battle, investigative searches or looking for rogue Iraqi policeman or local gangsters. “These people are tired of being threatened by the insurgents,” said Cpl. Brian McNeill, a Springfield, Mo., native and team leader with A Company.

    Husaybah used to be a hotbed for insurgency activity, but after years of fighting Marines, the townspeople now want to live in peace and realize the insurgents were only there to cause destruction. The new battle is winning the “hearts and minds” of the people here and that’s done by showing Marines care about the citizens here and by keeping fear away from their homes.

    “The big fighting is done, but the insurgents are trying to intimidate the people,” said Cpl. Peter Andrisevic, a rifleman with A Company. A handful of bullet holes in someone’s door won’t make the strong-willed citizens cower to insurgents, but the quicker the culprits are found, the quicker the people can go on living in peace.

    “This is a dramatic change from OIF II,” Banks said. “This is a one-hundred and eighty degree turn around from what I saw before.” Operation Iraqi Freedom II had major battles in large cities throughout Iraq, but this intelligence-driven war for the safety of Husaybah uses information from its people to capture insurgents and Al Qaeda in Iraq.

    “The people who know the most are the average citizens,” Andrisevic said. Insurgents and AQI [al Qaida in Iraq] know the Iraqi Army and Police, and the Marines are hunting them down through intelligence gathered by citizens looking for justice and peace, so they hide in towns like Husaybah, using guerrilla tactics. “Insurgents are hiding here as a resting area,” Andrisevic said. “They aren’t trying to find us but we’re trying to find them.”

    The enemy can’t hide forever because the people don’t want them in their town. Husaybah thrives off trade and business, and without safety and security, they can’t do either. Working with the newly formed government and coalition forces seems to be the right way in their minds.

    “An IP called in with information about a weapons cache,” McNeill said. The Marine said the IP was a former supporter of the insurgency here but has joined the police force and now fights for the peace and prosperity of his people. The people here want their families to live in peace. Coalition forces want them to have peace.

    “If we don’t stabilize the area and find the insurgents, we’ve wasted the last four years here,” Andrisevic said.

    Photo – Cpl. Peter Andrisevic, a rifleman with Alpha Company, Task Force 1st Battalion, 4th Marines attached to Regimental Combat Team 2 listens to a citizen early morning about shots fired a week ago into his neighbor’s home. Alpha Company Marines had an intelligence-driven patrol investigating who shot at the citizen’s home and why. Photo by Cpl. Eric C. Schwartz.

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    News from CentCom:

    21 Jun 07
    by Spc. Carl N. Hudson
    Combined Press Information Center
    .
    BAGHDAD – The Fardh Al-Qanoon spokesman and a Multi-National Force-Iraq spokesman held a press conference at the Combined Press Information Center Wednesday.

    Iraqi Army Brig. Gen. Qassim Atta Al-Moussawi, Fardh Al-Qanoon spokesman, and U.S. Navy Rear Adm. Mark Fox, a Multi-National Force-Iraq spokesman, discussed the progress of Fardh Al-Qanoon. [Continue reading.]

    All 30,000 troops are finally in place, and the Iraqi Army (IA) is working well with them. Sometimes the IA would take the lead in the missions, while at other times the MNF-I would take the lead.

    This was a conference to let the people know that no matter what they were hearing in the press, they were indeed working hand in hand. Literally! It’s a good report. Thank you, and have a nice day.

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